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Thread: Quake Tips?

  1. #41
    Senior Member eduguy is an unknown quantity at this point
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    Another question. I have 15 hours of time played and I still am so bad at quake live that i quit the game i'm in sometimes. I just joined a game skill matched and they were way better then me so i constantly died so i quit that game. Why am i still so bad at this? Maybe i should just quit quake...

  2. #42
    *fonsxe
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    Quote Originally Posted by eduguy View Post
    Another question. I have 15 hours of time played and I still am so bad at quake live that i quit the game i'm in sometimes. I just joined a game skill matched and they were way better then me so i constantly died so i quit that game. Why am i still so bad at this? Maybe i should just quit quake...
    Are you kidding? 15 hours is nothing. Seriously. Some people have spent years in this game. You're not even a baby yet, you're still in the womb.

    (If you do see a very strong player with less time on his profile most of the time it's a veteran player who just created a new account, or they're coming from another similar game.)

    In my experience a good way to learn as a beginner is to go spectator and watch the top player, see what they do, how they play, how they move etc.
    Also you can join a higher tier just to spectate because your profile indicates you're only tier 2 and you're not going to learn a lot there.

    At your level I wouldn't worry too much about perfecting strafe jumping yet, just try to do it while playing and it will become easier with time. A LOT OF TIME.

  3. #43
    Senior Member Limbless_Pony will become famous soon enough Limbless_Pony will become famous soon enough
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    Quote Originally Posted by fonsxe View Post
    Are you kidding?
    No, he's trolling. And he's a very poor troll, so just ignore ;s

  4. #44
    Senior Member eduguy is an unknown quantity at this point
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    Quote Originally Posted by fonsxe View Post
    Are you kidding? 15 hours is nothing. Seriously. Some people have spent years in this game. You're not even a baby yet, you're still in the womb.

    (If you do see a very strong player with less time on his profile most of the time it's a veteran player who just created a new account, or they're coming from another similar game.)



    In my experience a good way to learn as a beginner is to go spectator and watch the top player, see what they do, how they play, how they move etc.
    Also you can join a higher tier just to spectate because your profile indicates you're only tier 2 and you're not going to learn a lot there.

    At your level I wouldn't worry too much about perfecting strafe jumping yet, just try to do it while playing and it will become easier with time. A LOT OF TIME.
    Thanks for your input.

  5. #45
    Senior Member eduguy is an unknown quantity at this point
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    Does anyone have tips for prediction shots?

  6. #46
    Senior Member Ikaruga is on a distinguished road
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    If you are for real, you are really a beginner in this game. You have to be very patient with the other players and with yourself. Most of the players are playing this game for years, some of them started more than a decade ago!
    • It will be difficult for you to find a game with other beginners, so if you like Quake and want to stay, expect to get beaten and destroyed a lot for a year (at least, but probably more.)

    • There is no easy way to get skill, but the easiest is to play a lot and have fun while you do it. Don't aim for impossible goals like "walking" on the walls or fragging people in top tier games, because it just won't happen, not yet. Clan Arena, FFA, Freeze TAG (it's premium sadly:/) are the gametypes you should play the most, or perhaps find some equally skilled duel partners to learn together.

    • I'm not a pro. but perhaps one of the best advice I can give you is that you should try to shoot when you certain that you will hit. This will be very difficult and tedious in the first few months, and will need a lot of concentration, but you won't regret it on the long run.
      It doesn't matter if you don't hit, don't get mad or frustrated, just continue playing and have fun, your aim will improve over time, the important thing is that you make every shoot count and as precise as possible, and you care about when and where you shoot . If you learn playing Quake this way, you will gain skill a lot faster.
    Last edited by Ikaruga; 12-16-2012 at 06:50 AM.

  7. #47
    Member inertiacreeP is on a distinguished road
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    your attitude is the most important thing. I try to enjoy improvement and learning. Ikaruga is correct, if you expect to be a Quake god too soon or too early, it'll just be frustrating and disappointing. Some people are naturals, though. Progress at whatever speed you progress, try to be cool with that, as with anything in life.

    If you're kicking the crap out of everyone in a game, it might be fun for a bit, but really you're just playing against players who are worse than you. Your skill is more or less the same.

  8. #48
    Senior Member eduguy is an unknown quantity at this point
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    Quake is really frustrating.

  9. #49
    Senior Member SquirrlWrangler is on a distinguished road SquirrlWrangler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eduguy View Post
    Quake is really frustrating.
    I used to feel the same way and sometimes I still do if I find myself playing against Lorfa or test.

    I watched a lot of demos and instructional videos. I downloaded practice maps to work on my strafe jumping. I'm still not that great at strafe or circle jumping but I'm better than I was. I also keep tinkering with my config.

    I improved slowly but for months I was consistently in tier 3 ctf, ffa, and tdm. Then one day I got bumped up to tier 4. I didn't stay there long, but I started to win more tier 3 ffa games. I got bumped up into tier 4 again and stayed there a bit longer.

    And then one day I noticed a big change. I was using cover much more effectively. I was suddenly anticipating the movements and trajectories of other players much better than I had been before. I began to shoot where they were going to be rather than where they were.

    Now I'm able to hold my own against tier 4 players much more than I had been in the past. I still have lots of areas that need improvement but at least I'm seeing improvement.

    Quakelive has ridiculously high learning curve compared to many other games. You really need to practice a lot, study demos and other players, and constantly strive to improve. It does pay off.

  10. #50
    Senior Member Ikaruga is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by SquirrlWrangler View Post
    I used to feel the same way and sometimes I still do if I find myself playing against Lorfa or test.

    I watched a lot of demos and instructional videos. I downloaded practice maps to work on my strafe jumping. I'm still not that great at strafe or circle jumping but I'm better than I was. I also keep tinkering with my config.

    I improved slowly but for months I was consistently in tier 3 ctf, ffa, and tdm. Then one day I got bumped up to tier 4. I didn't stay there long, but I started to win more tier 3 ffa games. I got bumped up into tier 4 again and stayed there a bit longer.

    And then one day I noticed a big change. I was using cover much more effectively. I was suddenly anticipating the movements and trajectories of other players much better than I had been before. I began to shoot where they were going to be rather than where they were.

    Now I'm able to hold my own against tier 4 players much more than I had been in the past. I still have lots of areas that need improvement but at least I'm seeing improvement.

    Quakelive has ridiculously high learning curve compared to many other games. You really need to practice a lot, study demos and other players, and constantly strive to improve. It does pay off.
    I was like you in this aspect, I always gained skill in steps and jumps, not gradually. Well I don't practice anymore, so I'm very far from my prime years now (aim wise at least), but I still remember that I was playing 5-6 hours every day and still stayed on the very same level for many months or even for a year, no improvements at all for the entire time. Then suddenly my skill just went up from one night to an other, and I ended up doing games with 500-1000 more damage and 3-5% more accuracy, and an other jump a year later, so on. I never really understood why was it happening like that.

    You are also right about testing new settings might help. I would recommend him to lower sens as much as possible, but he has space problems on his desk, and no mousepad as well, so perhaps it's too soon to mess with little details like that.

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